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Mrs. McGann/Ms. Pereira – Third Trimester, 2019-20

Posted on April 10, 2020

Homeroom: Grade 5
Science: Grades: 4 through 8
STEM: Grades 4 through 8

Third Trimester Science Curriculum 2020

Grade 4

 Grade 4 Science

Essential Question: How do the structures of plants and animals help them to survive in their environment?

  • An object can be seen when light reflected from its surface enters the eyes. (4-PS4-2)
  • Different sense receptors are specialized for particular kinds of information, which may be then processed by the animal’s brain. Animals are able to use their perceptions and memories to guide their actions. (4-LS1-2) 

Essential Question: How do we know energy is conserved as it is transformed from one form to another?

  • Sound and Light energy, magnetism, electrical currents
  • Energy can be transferred by moving objects or by sound, light, heat, or electric currents. (4-PS3-2) 
  •  Energy is present whenever there are moving objects, sound, light, or heat. When objects collide, energy can be transferred from one object to another, thereby changing their motion. In such collisions, some energy is typically also transferred to the surrounding air; as a result, the air gets heated and sound is produced. (4-PS3-2) 
  • Energy can also be transferred by electric currents, which can then be used locally to produce motion, sound, heat, or light. The currents may have been produced to begin with by transforming the energy of motion into elecPS4.

Essential Question: How do Earth’s processes, natural processes and organisms change Earth over time?

  • Waves, which are regular patterns of motion, can be made in water by disturbing the surface. When waves move across the surface of deep water, the water goes up and down in place; there is no net motion in the direction of the wave except when the water meets a beach. (4-PS4-1) 
  •  Waves of the same type can differ in amplitude (height of the wave) and wavelength (spacing between wave peaks). (4-PS4-1) 

Health Topics:

  • Protection from sun’s radiation
  • Importance of Vitamin (A,D,C)
  • What is a well balanced diet?

Grade 5

Grade 5 Science

Essential Question: How much does air weigh?

Structure and Properties of Matter 

Matter of any type can be subdivided into particles that are too small to see, but even then the matter still exists and can be detected by other means. A model showing that gases are made from matter particles that are too small to see and are moving freely around in space can explain many observations, including the inflation and shape of a balloon and the effects of air on larger particles or objects. (5-PS1-1) 

Essential Question: Where does rain come from? 

 Human activities in agriculture, industry, and everyday life have had major effects on the land, vegetation, streams, ocean, air, and even outer space. But individuals and communities are doing things to help protect Earth’s resources and environment. (5-ESS3-1)

Nearly all of Earth’s available water is in the ocean. Most fresh water is in glaciers or in the underground; only a tiny fraction is in streams, lakes, wetlands and the atmosphere. (5-ESS2-2)

 Earth’s major systems are the geosphere (solid and molten rock, soil, and sediments), the hydrosphere (water and ice), the atmosphere (air), and the biosphere (living things, including humans). These systems interact in multiple ways to affect Earth’s surface materials and processes. The ocean supports a variety of ecosystems and organisms, shapes landforms, and influences climate. Winds and clouds in the atmosphere interact with the landforms to determine patterns of weather. (5-ESS2-1)

Health Topic:

Earth Day=how can we protect our environment as 5th grade students?

Grade 6

Grade 6 Science Third Trimester

Essential Question: How does energy flow through electrical systems and magnetic fields?

  •  Electric and magnetic (electromagnetic) forces can be attractive or repulsive, and their sizes depend on the magnitudes of the charges, currents, or magnetic strengths involved and on the distances between the interacting objects. (MS-PS2-3) 
  •  Forces that act at a distance (electric, magnetic, and gravitational) can be explained by fields that extend through space and can be mapped by their effect on a test object (a charged object, or a ball, respectively). (MS-PS2-5) 
  •  An electric circuit is a closed path in which an electric current can exist. (MS-PS3-6)

 

Essential Question: If the climate is warming then why do we have such cold weather?

  •  Each substance has characteristic physical and chemical properties (for any bulk quantity under given conditions) that can be used to identify it. (MS-PS1-3), (MS-PS1-7) 
  •  Water continually cycles among land, ocean, and atmosphere via transpiration, evaporation, condensation, sublimation, deposition, precipitation, infiltration, and runoff. (MS-ESS2-4) 
  •  The complex patterns of the changes and the movement of water in the atmosphere, determined by winds, landforms, and ocean temperatures and currents, are major determinants of local weather patterns. (MS-ESS2-5) 
  •  Global movements of water and its changes in form are driven by sunlight and gravity. (MS-ESS2-4) 
  •  Variations in density due to variations in temperature and salinity drive a global pattern of interconnected ocean currents. (MS-ESS2-6) 
  •  Weather and climate are influenced by interactions involving sunlight, the ocean, the atmosphere, ice, landforms, and living things. These interactions vary with latitude, altitude, and local and regional geography, all of which can affect oceanic and atmospheric flow patterns. (MS-ESS2-6) 
  •  Because these patterns are so complex, weather can only be predicted probabilistically. (MS-ESS2-5) 
  • The ocean exerts a major influence on weather and climate by absorbing energy from the sun, releasing it over time, and globally redistributing through ocean life. (MS-ESS2-6)

 

Essential Question: Can humans change Earth’s climate?

 

  •  Human activities have significantly altered the biosphere, sometimes damaging or destroying natural habitats and causing the extinction of other species. But changes to Earth’s environments can have different impacts (negative and positive) for different living things. (MS-ESS3-3) 
  • Typically as human populations and per-capita consumption of natural resources increase, so do the negative impacts on Earth unless the activities and technologies involved are engineered otherwise. (MS-ESS3-3) 
  •  Human activities, such as the release of greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels, are major factors in the current rise in Earth’s mean surface temperature (global warming). Reducing the level of climate change and reducing human vulnerability to whatever climate changes do occur depend on the understanding of climate science, engineering capabilities, and other kinds of knowledge, such as understanding of human behavior and on applying that knowledge wisely in decisions and activities. (MS-ESS3-5)

 

Health:

Understanding the changes humans are making on the Earth’s climate, how can we protect ourselves? What changes do we need to make to help not only Earth but the health of the future generations?

Grade 7

  • Grade 7 Science Third TrimesterEssential Question: How does the surface of the Earth change over time?
    •  The geologic time scale interpreted from rock strata provides a way to organize Earth’s history. Analyses of rock strata and the fossil record provide only relative dates, not an absolute scale. (MS-ESS1-4) 
    • Tectonic processes continually generate new ocean sea floor at ridges and destroy old sea floor at trenches. (secondary to MS-ESS2-3) 
    •  All Earth processes are the result of energy flowing and matter cycling within and among the planet’s systems. This energy is derived from the sun and Earth’s hot interior. The energy that flows and matter that cycle produce chemical and physical changes in Earth’s materials and living organisms. (MS-ESS2-1) 
    • The planet’s systems interact over scales that range from microscopic to global in size, and they operate over fractions of a second to billions of years. These interactions have shaped Earth’s history and will determine its future. (MS-ESS2-2) 
    • Maps of ancient land and water patterns, based on investigations of rocks and fossils, make clear how Earth’s plates have moved great distances, collided, and spread apart. (MS-ESS2-3) 
    • Water’s movements—both on the land and underground—cause weathering and erosion, which change the land’s surface features and create underground formations. (MS-ESS2-2)

    Essential Question:  How can we prevent or minimize harm from a natural disaster?

    • Humans depend on Earth’s land, ocean, atmosphere, and biosphere for many different resources. Minerals, fresh water, and biosphere resources are limited, and many are not renewable or replaceable over human lifetimes. These resources are distributed unevenly around the planet as a result of past geologic processes. (MS-ESS3-1) 
    •  Mapping the history of natural hazards in a region, combined with an understanding of related geologic forces can help forecast the locations and likelihoods of future events. (MS-ESS3-2) 
    •  Human activities have significantly altered the biosphere, sometimes damaging or destroying natural habitats and causing the extinction of other species. But changes to Earth’s environments can have different impacts (negative and positive) for different living things. (MS-ESS3-3) 
    •  Typically as human populations and per-capita consumption of natural resources increase, so do the negative impacts on Earth unless the activities and technologies involved are engineered otherwise.

    Health Topics: Understanding the changes humans are making on the Earth’s climate, how can we protect ourselves? What changes do we need to make to help not only Earth but the health of the future generations?

    How can we effectively manage the use of natural resources to preserve them for the future?

Grade 8

  • Energy, Forces , and Motion

Essential Question:

How do Newton’s Laws help us to better understand the impact of collisions between two objects?

  • Newton’s Laws of Motion
  • Gravitational interaction and mass
  • Kinetic energy
  • Earth’s Place in the Universe

Essential Question:

What would happen if gravity did not exist?

  • Gravitational interaction among masses
  • Lunar phases, eclipses of the Sun, Moon, and the seasons
  • Motions in the galaxy and solar systems
  • Properties of objects in the solar system

Religion 5

The Sacraments:
Anointing of the Sick
The Coming of the Holy Spirit in Confirmation
The Eucharist
Matrimony
Holy Orders
 
One Holy, Catholic ,and Apostolic Church
Mary, Our Mother
The Rosary
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